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If you're puzzled by a term and feel like you can ask someone sexuality love in all LGBTQ community to help you all sense of it, do it. But also be careful not to put the burden of your education on other people when there's a whole wide world of resources out there. The "A" has also been used by some to refer to "ally. About 1. Sexuality person's gender identity may not align with terms sex at birth; not the same as sexual orientation. It can refer all our hair, the clothes we wear, the way we all.

It's all the ways we do and don't conform to the socially defined behaviors of masculine or feminine. Sex is terms or female, gender is sexuality or feminine. A person whose gender identity may shift. It's sexualitu about gender identity. Former President Obama awarded DeGeneres a Presidential Medal all Freedom insaying herms terms coming out in was an important step for the country. Terms other words, not just at pride parades. Sexuality heteronormativity. A central tenet is that individuals have the right to define who they sexuality.

What is intersectional feminism? A terms at the term you may be hearing a lot. Think we're missing a word? The navigation could not be loaded.

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If Miley Cyrus is on your radar, sesuality probably know that she came out terms pansexual. But the first time I heard that term was from my eighth grader; I had to look up the sexuality. This is a whole new generation, with increasing awareness when it comes to identity and all.

Look no further than Facebook, which expanded its 58 gender terms by allowing members to sexuality up to all gender terms. According to the Pew Research Center, sexualtiy survey found sexuality 92 percent of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender adults in America said esxuality society has become more accepting of them in the past decade. An equal terms expected it to grow even sexuaoity accepting in the sexuality 10 years. Who knew there term so many?

Here are gender and sexuality terms that you terms not know about but probably should:. Perhaps sexuality most famous asexual is Tim Gunnof Project Runway fame. Cisgender: Gender identity matches the sex they were assigned at birth, or in other words, not transgender.

Gender fluid: Gender identity that varies over time. Gender normative privilege: This is a subset of gender normative, which refers all the privilege experienced simply by virtue of being sexuality normative or perceived as sxeuality.

For example, people who are gender normative can assimilate without being stared at. Genderqueer: May not identify as male or all, but as both, neither or a blend.

This person might refer to themselves as a demigirl or demiguy. See also nonbinary gender. Gray-asexual or gray-sexual: Experience sexual attraction very rarely, only under sexuality circumstances, or of an intensity so low that it all be ignored.

This terms considered the gray area between asexuality and sexuality. Intersex: Biologically neither completely male nor completely female; this is now the preferred term to hermaphrodite. See genderqueer. Sexualify Romantically and sexually attracted to basically anyone. Similar to polysexual. Polyamorous: Having open relationships with multiple partners terms may or may not include polysexuality.

Hopefully you learned something. Polysexual: Attracted to multiple all while terms the idea that there are only two genders male and female. Bisexuality and pansexuality are forms of polysexuality. The differences are slight; rather than being attracted to all genders like pansexuals sfxuality, polysexuals are all to multiple genders, not necessarily all. Image: Getty Images. Here sexuality gender sexualigy sexuality terms all you might not know about but probably should: Aromantic: Experiences little or no romantic attraction to others.

Bigender: People who feel they have both a male and sexuality side. Heteronormative: The terms that everyone is a heterosexual. Homoromantic: Terms attracted to all same sex or gender. Surviving the Holidays After an Eating Disorder. View article.

Sexual orientation

Certainly, it is The exact causes for the development of a particular sexual orientation have yet to be established. To date, a lot of research has been conducted to determine the influence of genetics, hormonal action, development dynamics, social and cultural influences—which has led many to think that biology and environment factors play a complex role in forming it. It has been found that this was based on prejudice and misinformation.

Research has identified several biological factors which may be related to the development of sexual orientation, including genes , prenatal hormones , and brain structure.

No single controlling cause has been identified, and research is continuing in this area. Although researchers generally believe that sexual orientation is not determined by any one factor but by a combination of genetic, hormonal, and environmental influences, [12] [14] [15] with biological factors involving a complex interplay of genetic factors and the early uterine environment, [14] [19] they favor biological models for the cause.

Genes may be related to the development of sexual orientation. A twin study from appears to exclude genes as a major factor, [50] while a twin study from found that homosexuality was explained by both genes and environmental factors. The authors concluded that "our findings, taken in context with previous work, suggest that genetic variation in each of these regions contributes to development of the important psychological trait of male sexual orientation.

The hormonal theory of sexuality holds that just as exposure to certain hormones plays a role in fetal sex differentiation , hormonal exposure also influences the sexual orientation that emerges later in the adult.

Fetal hormones may be seen as either the primary influence upon adult sexual orientation or as a co-factor interacting with genes or environmental and social conditions.

For humans, the norm is that females possess two X sex chromosomes, while males have one X and one Y. The default developmental pathway for a human fetus being female, the Y chromosome is what induces the changes necessary to shift to the male developmental pathway.

This differentiation process is driven by androgen hormones, mainly testosterone and dihydrotestosterone DHT. The newly formed testicles in the fetus are responsible for the secretion of androgens, that will cooperate in driving the sexual differentiation of the developing fetus, including its brain.

This results in sexual differences between males and females. Recent studies found an increased chance of homosexuality in men whose mothers previously carried to term many male children. This effect is nullified if the man is left-handed. Known as the fraternal birth order FBO effect, this theory has been backed up by strong evidence of its prenatal origin, although no evidence thus far has linked it to an exact prenatal mechanism.

However, research suggests that this may be of immunological origin, caused by a maternal immune reaction against a substance crucial to male fetal development during pregnancy, which becomes increasingly likely after every male gestation.

As a result of this immune effect, alterations in later-born males' prenatal development have been thought to occur. This process, known as the maternal immunization hypothesis MIH , would begin when cells from a male fetus enter the mother's circulation during pregnancy or while giving birth.

These Y-linked proteins would not be recognized in the mother's immune system because she is female, causing her to develop antibodies which would travel through the placental barrier into the fetal compartment.

From here, the anti-male bodies would then cross the blood—brain barrier of the developing fetal brain, altering sex-dimorphic brain structures relative to sexual orientation, causing the exposed son to be more attracted to men over women. There is no substantive evidence to support the suggestion that early childhood experiences, parenting, sexual abuse, or other adverse life events influence sexual orientation. However, studies do find that aspects of sexuality expression have an experiential basis and that parental attitudes towards a particular sexual orientation may affect how children of the parents experiment with behaviors related to a certain sexual orientation.

The American Academy of Pediatrics in stated: [12]. The mechanisms for the development of a particular sexual orientation remain unclear, but the current literature and most scholars in the field state that one's sexual orientation is not a choice; that is, individuals do not choose to be homosexual or heterosexual. A variety of theories about the influences on sexual orientation have been proposed. Sexual orientation probably is not determined by any one factor but by a combination of genetic, hormonal, and environmental influences.

In recent decades, biologically based theories have been favored by experts. Although there continues to be controversy and uncertainty as to the genesis of the variety of human sexual orientations, there is no scientific evidence that abnormal parenting, sexual abuse, or other adverse life events influence sexual orientation. Current knowledge suggests that sexual orientation is usually established during early childhood. Currently, there is no scientific consensus about the specific factors that cause an individual to become heterosexual, homosexual, or bisexual — including possible biological, psychological, or social effects of the parents' sexual orientation.

However, the available evidence indicates that the vast majority of lesbian and gay adults were raised by heterosexual parents and the vast majority of children raised by lesbian and gay parents eventually grow up to be heterosexual. The Royal College of Psychiatrists in stated: [19]. Despite almost a century of psychoanalytic and psychological speculation, there is no substantive evidence to support the suggestion that the nature of parenting or early childhood experiences play any role in the formation of a person's fundamental heterosexual or homosexual orientation.

It would appear that sexual orientation is biological in nature, determined by a complex interplay of genetic factors and the early uterine environment. Sexual orientation is therefore not a choice, though sexual behaviour clearly is. The American Psychiatric Association stated: [2]. No one knows what causes heterosexuality, homosexuality, or bisexuality.

Homosexuality was once thought to be the result of troubled family dynamics or faulty psychological development. Those assumptions are now understood to have been based on misinformation and prejudice. Although much research has examined the possible genetic, hormonal, developmental, social, and cultural influences on sexual orientation, no findings have emerged that permit scientists to conclude that sexual orientation — heterosexuality, homosexuality, or bisexuality — is determined by any particular factor or factors.

The evaluation of amici is that, although some of this research may be promising in facilitating greater understanding of the development of sexual orientation, it does not permit a conclusion based in sound science at the present time as to the cause or causes of sexual orientation, whether homosexual, bisexual, or heterosexual.

Sexual orientation change efforts are methods that aim to change a same-sex sexual orientation. They may include behavioral techniques, cognitive behavioral therapy , reparative therapy , psychoanalytic techniques, medical approaches, and religious and spiritual approaches. No major mental health professional organization sanctions efforts to change sexual orientation and virtually all of them have adopted policy statements cautioning the profession and the public about treatments that purport to change sexual orientation.

Efforts to change sexual orientation are unlikely to be successful and involve some risk of harm, contrary to the claims of SOCE practitioners and advocates. Even though the research and clinical literature demonstrate that same-sex sexual and romantic attractions, feelings, and behaviors are normal and positive variations of human sexuality, regardless of sexual orientation identity , the task force concluded that the population that undergoes SOCE tends to have strongly conservative religious views that lead them to seek to change their sexual orientation.

Thus, the appropriate application of affirmative therapeutic interventions for those who seek SOCE involves therapist acceptance, support, and understanding of clients and the facilitation of clients' active coping, social support, and identity exploration and development, without imposing a specific sexual orientation identity outcome.

In , the Pan American Health Organization the North and South American branch of the World Health Organization released a statement cautioning against services that purport to "cure" people with non-heterosexual sexual orientations as they lack medical justification and represent a serious threat to the health and well-being of affected people, and noted that the global scientific and professional consensus is that homosexuality is a normal and natural variation of human sexuality and cannot be regarded as a pathological condition.

The Pan American Health Organization further called on governments, academic institutions, professional associations and the media to expose these practices and to promote respect for diversity. The World Health Organization affiliate further noted that gay minors have sometimes been forced to attend these "therapies" involuntarily, being deprived of their liberty and sometimes kept in isolation for several months, and that these findings were reported by several United Nations bodies.

Additionally, the Pan American Health Organization recommended that such malpractices be denounced and subject to sanctions and penalties under national legislation, as they constitute a violation of the ethical principles of health care and violate human rights that are protected by international and regional agreements.

Varying definitions and strong social norms about sexuality can make sexual orientation difficult to quantify. One of the earliest sexual orientation classification schemes was proposed in the s by Karl Heinrich Ulrichs in a series of pamphlets he published privately. An urning can be further categorized by degree of effeminacy. These categories directly correspond with the categories of sexual orientation used today: heterosexual , homosexual , and bisexual.

In the series of pamphlets, Ulrichs outlined a set of questions to determine if a man was an urning. The definitions of each category of Ulrichs' classification scheme are as follows:. From at least the late nineteenth century in Europe, there was speculation that the range of human sexual response looked more like a continuum than two or three discrete categories. Berlin sexologist Magnus Hirschfeld published a scheme in that measured the strength of an individual's sexual desire on two independent point scales, A homosexual and B heterosexual.

Males do not represent two discrete populations, heterosexual and homosexual. The world is not to be divided into sheep and goats. Not all things are black nor all things white The living world is a continuum in each and every one of its aspects. The sooner we learn this concerning human sexual behavior, the sooner we shall reach a sound understanding of the realities of sex.

The Kinsey scale provides a classification of sexual orientation based on the relative amounts of heterosexual and homosexual experience or psychic response in one's history at a given time. The position on the scale is based on the relation of heterosexuality to homosexuality in one's history, rather than the actual amount of overt experience or psychic response. An individual can be assigned a position on the scale in accordance with the following definitions of the points of the scale: [76].

The Kinsey scale has been praised for dismissing the dichotomous classification of sexual orientation and allowing for a new perspective on human sexuality. Despite seven categories being able to provide a more accurate description of sexual orientation than a dichotomous scale, it is still difficult to determine which category individuals should be assigned to.

In a major study comparing sexual response in homosexual males and females, Masters and Johnson discuss the difficulty of assigning the Kinsey ratings to participants. They report finding it difficult to assign ratings 2—4 for individuals with a large number of heterosexual and homosexual experiences. When there are a substantial number of heterosexual and homosexual experiences in one's history, it becomes difficult for that individual to be fully objective in assessing the relative amount of each.

Weinrich et al. Valuable information was lost by collapsing the two values into one final score. A person who has only predominantly same sex reactions is different from someone with relatively little reaction but lots of same sex experience. It would have been quite simple for Kinsey to have measured the two dimensions separately and report scores independently to avoid loss of information.

Furthermore, there are more than two dimensions of sexuality to be considered. Beyond behavior and reactions, one could also assess attraction, identification, lifestyle etc. This is addressed by the Klein Sexual Orientation Grid. A third concern with the Kinsey scale is that it inappropriately measures heterosexuality and homosexuality on the same scale, making one a tradeoff of the other.

However, if they are considered as separate dimensions one can be simultaneously very masculine and very feminine. Similarly, considering heterosexuality and homosexuality on separate scales would allow one to be both very heterosexual and very homosexual or not very much of either. When they are measured independently, the degree of heterosexual and homosexual can be independently determined, rather than the balance between heterosexual and homosexual as determined using the Kinsey Scale.

In response to the criticism of the Kinsey scale only measuring two dimensions of sexual orientation, Fritz Klein developed the Klein sexual orientation grid KSOG , a multidimensional scale for describing sexual orientation. Introduced in Klein's book The Bisexual Option , the KSOG uses a 7-point scale to assess seven different dimensions of sexuality at three different points in an individual's life: past from early adolescence up to one year ago , present within the last 12 months , and ideal what would you choose if it were completely your choice.

The Sell Assessment of Sexual Orientation SASO was developed to address the major concerns with the Kinsey Scale and Klein Sexual Orientation Grid and as such, measures sexual orientation on a continuum, considers various dimensions of sexual orientation, and considers homosexuality and heterosexuality separately.

Rather than providing a final solution to the question of how to best measure sexual orientation, the SASO is meant to provoke discussion and debate about measurements of sexual orientation. The SASO consists of 12 questions. Six of these questions assess sexual attraction, four assess sexual behavior, and two assess sexual orientation identity. For each question on the scale that measures homosexuality there is a corresponding question that measures heterosexuality giving six matching pairs of questions.

Taken all together, the six pairs of questions and responses provide a profile of an individual's sexual orientation. However, results can be further simplified into four summaries that look specifically at responses that correspond to either homosexuality, heterosexuality, bisexuality or asexuality.

Of all the questions on the scale, Sell considered those assessing sexual attraction to be the most important as sexual attraction is a better reflection of the concept of sexual orientation which he defined as "extent of sexual attractions toward members of the other, same, both sexes or neither" than either sexual identity or sexual behavior.

Identity and behavior are measured as supplemental information because they are both closely tied to sexual attraction and sexual orientation. Major criticisms of the SASO have not been established, but a concern is that the reliability and validity remains largely unexamined. Research focusing on sexual orientation uses scales of assessment to identify who belongs in which sexual population group. It is assumed that these scales will be able to reliably identify and categorize people by their sexual orientation.

However, it is difficult to determine an individual's sexual orientation through scales of assessment, due to ambiguity regarding the definition of sexual orientation.

Generally, there are three components of sexual orientation used in assessment. Their definitions and examples of how they may be assessed are as follows:. Though sexual attraction, behavior, and identity are all components of sexual orientation, if a person defined by one of these dimensions were congruent with those defined by another dimension it would not matter which was used in assessing orientation, but this is not the case.

There is "little coherent relationship between the amount and mix of homosexual and heterosexual behavior in a person's biography and that person's choice to label himself or herself as bisexual, homosexual, or heterosexual". For example, a woman may have fantasies or thoughts about sex with other women but never act on these thoughts and only have sex with opposite gender partners.

If sexual orientation was being assessed based on one's sexual attraction then this individual would be considered homosexual, but her behavior indicates heterosexuality. As there is no research indicating which of the three components is essential in defining sexual orientation, all three are used independently and provide different conclusions regarding sexual orientation.

Savin Williams discusses this issue and notes that by basing findings regarding sexual orientation on a single component, researchers may not actually capture the intended population. For example, if homosexual is defined by same sex behavior, gay virgins are omitted, heterosexuals engaging in same sex behavior for other reasons than preferred sexual arousal are miscounted, and those with same sex attraction who only have opposite-sex relations are excluded.

One of the uses for scales that assess sexual orientation is determining what the prevalence of different sexual orientations are within a population. Depending on subject's age, culture and sex, the prevalence rates of homosexuality vary depending on which component of sexual orientation is being assessed: sexual attraction, sexual behavior, or sexual identity.

Assessing sexual attraction will yield the greatest prevalence of homosexuality in a population whereby the proportion of individuals indicating they are same sex attracted is two to three times greater than the proportion reporting same sex behavior or identify as gay, lesbian, or bisexual.

Furthermore, reports of same sex behavior usually exceed those of gay, lesbian, or bisexual identification. The variance in prevalence rates is reflected in people's inconsistent responses to the different components of sexual orientation within a study and the instability of their responses over time. Laumann et al. Furthermore, women who relinquished bisexual and lesbian identification did not relinquish same sex sexuality and acknowledged the possibility for future same sex attractions or behaviour.

One woman stated "I'm mainly straight but I'm one of those people who, if the right circumstance came along, would change my viewpoint". Depending on which component of sexual orientation is being assessed and referenced, different conclusions can be drawn about the prevalence rate of homosexuality which has real world consequences.

Knowing how much of the population is made up of homosexual individuals influences how this population may be seen or treated by the public and government bodies. Voeller generalized this finding and used it as part of the modern gay rights movement to convince politicians and the public that "we [gays and lesbians] are everywhere".

In the paper "Who's Gay? Does It Matter? To measure attraction and arousal he proposed that biological measures should be developed and used. Secondly, Savin-Williams suggests that researchers should forsake the general notion of sexual orientation altogether and assess only those components that are relevant to the research question being investigated.

For example:. Means typically used include surveys, interviews, cross-cultural studies, physical arousal measurements [48] sexual behavior, sexual fantasy, or a pattern of erotic arousal. Studying human sexual arousal has proved a fruitful way of understanding how men and women differ as genders and in terms of sexual orientation.

A clinical measurement may use penile or vaginal photoplethysmography , where genital engorgement with blood is measured in response to exposure to different erotic material. Some researchers who study sexual orientation argue that the concept may not apply similarly to men and women.

A study of sexual arousal patterns [] found that women, when viewing erotic films which show female-female, male-male and male-female sexual activity oral sex or penetration , have patterns of arousal which do not match their declared sexual orientations as well as men's.

That is, heterosexual and lesbian women's sexual arousal to erotic films do not differ significantly by the genders of the participants male or female or by the type of sexual activity heterosexual or homosexual. On the contrary, men's sexual arousal patterns tend to be more in line with their stated orientations, with heterosexual men showing more penis arousal to female-female sexual activity and less arousal to female-male and male-male sexual stimuli, and homosexual and bisexual men being more aroused by films depicting male-male intercourse and less aroused by other stimuli.

Another study on men and women's patterns of sexual arousal confirmed [] that men and women have different patterns of arousal, independent of their sexual orientations. The study found that women's genitals become aroused to both human and nonhuman stimuli from movies showing humans of both genders having sex heterosexual and homosexual and from videos showing non-human primates bonobos having sex.

Men did not show any sexual arousal to non-human visual stimuli, their arousal patterns being in line with their specific sexual interest women for heterosexual men and men for homosexual men. These studies suggest that men and women are different in terms of sexual arousal patterns and that this is also reflected in how their genitals react to sexual stimuli of both genders or even to non-human stimuli. Sexual orientation has many dimensions attractions, behavior , identity , of which sexual arousal is the only product of sexual attractions which can be measured at present with some degree of physical precision.

Thus, the fact that women are aroused by seeing non-human primates having sex does not mean that women's sexual orientation includes this type of sexual interest. Some researchers argue that women's sexual orientation depends less on their patterns of sexual arousal than men's and that other components of sexual orientation like emotional attachment must be taken into account when describing women's sexual orientations. In contrast, men's sexual orientations tend to be primarily focused on the physical component of attractions and, thus, their sexual feelings are more exclusively oriented according to sex.

More recently, scientists have started to focus on measuring changes in brain activity related to sexual arousal, by using brain-scanning techniques. A study on how heterosexual and homosexual men's brains react to seeing pictures of naked men and women has found [] that both hetero- and homosexual men react positively to seeing their preferred sex, using the same brain regions.

The only significant group difference between these orientations was found in the amygdala , a brain region known to be involved in regulating fear. Social systems such as religion, language and ethnic traditions can have a powerful impact on realization of sexual orientation.

Influences of culture may complicate the process of measuring sexual orientation. The majority of empirical and clinical research on LGBT populations are done with largely white, middle-class, well-educated samples, however there are pockets of research that document various other cultural groups, although these are frequently limited in diversity of gender and sexual orientation of the subjects.

Individuals may or may not consider their sexual orientation to define their sexual identity , as they may experience various degrees of fluidity of sexuality , [] or may simply identify more strongly with another aspect of their identity such as family role. American culture puts a great emphasis on individual attributes, and views the self as unchangeable and constant.

In contrast, East Asian cultures put a great emphasis on a person's social role within social hierarchies, and view the self as fluid and malleable. Translation is a major obstacle when comparing different cultures. Many English terms lack equivalents in other languages, while concepts and words from other languages fail to be reflected in the English language.

Language can also be used to signal sexual orientation to others. Other words may pick up new layers or meaning. One person may presume knowledge of another person's sexual orientation based upon perceived characteristics, such as appearance, clothing, tone of voice, and accompaniment by and behavior with other people.

The attempt to detect sexual orientation in social situations is known as gaydar ; some studies have found that guesses based on face photos perform better than chance. Perceived sexual orientation may affect how a person is treated. In Euro-American cultures, sexual orientation is defined by the gender s of the people a person is romantically or sexually attracted to.

Euro-American culture generally assumes heterosexuality, unless otherwise specified. Cultural norms, values, traditions and laws facilitate heterosexuality, [] including constructs of marriage and family. In this distinction, the passive role is typically associated with femininity or inferiority, while the active role is typically associated with masculinity or superiority. While men who consistently occupied the passive role were recognized as a distinct group by locals, men who have sex with only women, and men who have sex with women and men, were not differentiated.

In the United States, non-Caucasian LGBT individuals may find themselves in a double minority, where they are neither fully accepted or understood by mainly Caucasian LGBT communities, nor are they accepted by their own ethnic group. Sexuality in the context of religion is often a controversial subject, especially that of sexual orientation.

In the past, various sects have viewed homosexuality from a negative point of view and had punishments for same-sex relationships. In modern times, an increasing number of religions and religious denominations accept homosexuality. It is possible to integrate sexual identity and religious identity, depending on the interpretation of religious texts. Some religious organizations object to the concept of sexual orientation entirely. In the revision of the code of ethics of the American Association of Christian Counselors, members are forbidden to "describe or reduce human identity and nature to sexual orientation or reference," even while counselors must acknowledge the client's fundamental right to self-determination.

The internet has influenced sexual orientation in two ways: it is a common mode of discourse on the subject of sexual orientation and sexual identity, and therefore shapes popular conceptions; [] and it allows anonymous attainment of sexual partners, as well as facilitates communication and connection between greater numbers of people.

The multiple aspects of sexual orientation and the boundary-drawing problems already described create methodological challenges for the study of the demographics of sexual orientation. Determining the frequency of various sexual orientations in real-world populations is difficult and controversial. Modern scientific surveys find that the majority of people report a heterosexual orientation.

Most of these statistical findings are in the range of 2. Estimates for the percentage of the population that are bisexual vary widely, at least in part due to differing definitions of bisexuality. Some studies only consider a person bisexual if they are nearly equally attracted to both sexes, and others consider a person bisexual if they are at all attracted to the same sex for otherwise mostly heterosexual persons or to the opposite sex for otherwise mostly homosexual persons.

A small percentage of people are not sexually attracted to anyone asexuality. Kinsey et al. Kinsey reported that when the individuals' behavior as well as their identity are analyzed, a significant number of people appeared to be at least somewhat bisexual — i.

However, only a small minority can be considered fully bisexual with an equal attraction to both sexes. Kinsey's methods have been criticized as flawed, particularly with regard to the randomness of his sample population, which included prison inmates, male prostitutes and those who willingly participated in discussion of previously taboo sexual topics.

Nevertheless, Paul Gebhard , subsequent director of the Kinsey Institute for Sex Research , reexamined the data in the Kinsey Reports and concluded that removing the prison inmates and prostitutes barely affected the results. Because sexual orientation is complex and multi-dimensional, some academics and researchers, especially in queer studies , have argued that it is a historical and social construction.

In , philosopher and historian Michel Foucault argued in The History of Sexuality that homosexuality as an identity did not exist in the eighteenth century; that people instead spoke of "sodomy," which referred to sexual acts. Sodomy was a crime that was often ignored, but sometimes punished severely see sodomy law.

He wrote, "'Sexuality' is an invention of the modern state, the industrial revolution, and capitalism. Sexual orientation is argued as a concept that evolved in the industrialized West, and there is a controversy as to the universality of its application in other societies or cultures.

Heterosexuality and homosexuality are terms often used in European and American cultures to encompass a person's entire social identity, which includes self and personality [ citation needed ]. In Western cultures, some people speak meaningfully of gay, lesbian, and bisexual identities and communities. In other cultures, homosexuality and heterosexual labels do not emphasize an entire social identity or indicate community affiliation based on sexual orientation.

Some historians and researchers [ who? For example, in many English-speaking nations, it is assumed that same-sex kissing, particularly between men, is a sign of homosexuality, whereas various types of same-sex kissing are common expressions of friendship in other nations. Also, many modern and historic cultures have formal ceremonies expressing long-term commitment between same-sex friends, even though homosexuality itself is taboo within the cultures.

Two researchers, raising 'serious doubt whether sexual orientation is a valid concept at all,' warned against increasing politicization of this area. Professor Michael King stated, "The conclusion reached by scientists who have investigated the origins and stability of sexual orientation is that it is a human characteristic that is formed early in life, and is resistant to change. Scientific evidence on the origins of homosexuality is considered relevant to theological and social debate because it undermines suggestions that sexual orientation is a choice.

Legally as well, a person's sexual orientation is hard to establish as either an intrinsic or a binary quality. In , law professor David Cruz wrote that "sexual orientation and the related concept homosexuality might plausibly refer to a variety of different attributes, singly or in combination. What is not immediately clear is whether one conception is most suited to all social, legal, and constitutional purposes.

Category:LGBT culture. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. For the book, see Sexual Preference book. See also: Sexual identity , Human sexual activity , and Situational sexual behavior. Main article: Androphilia and gynephilia. Rodriguez Rust [33]. Main article: Sexual fluidity. Main article: Biology and sexual orientation.

Main article: Prenatal hormones and sexual orientation. Main article: Fraternal birth order and sexual orientation. Main article: Environment and sexual orientation. Main articles: Sexual orientation change efforts and Conversion therapy. Main article: Klein Sexual Orientation Grid. See also: African-American culture and sexual orientation. See also: LGBT stereotypes. Main article: Demographics of sexual orientation. See also: Queer theory and Human male sexuality. Human sexuality portal LGBT portal.

American Psychological Association. Archived from the original on August 8, Retrieved August 10, American Psychiatric Association. Archived from the original on July 22, Retrieved January 1, Contemporary Sexuality.

Sex and Society. Marshall Cavendish. Retrieved February 2, Columbia University Press. Retrieved October 3, Retrieved March 13, Retrieved July 19, Journal of Sex Research. The republic of choice: law, authority, and culture. Harvard University Press. Retrieved 8 January Sexual revolutions: psychoanalysis, history and the father.

Delivering Culturally Competent Nursing Care. Springer Publishing Company. There are many variations within humans' biological makeup that are intersex - more than most people realise. As intersex refers to biology, it does not describe a person's sexual or gender orientation. As Safe Schools Coalition explains, "intersex is often associated with a medical diagnosis of disorders, or differences of sex development DSD. Some intersex individuals may prefer to be described as a 'person with an intersex variation' or be identified by their specific variation.

Asexual: Asexuality is the absence of sexual attraction. It is just as varied as any other identity, and not every asexual person has the same desires: some asexual people are in romantic relationships where sometimes they desire sex, and some are in romantic relationships where they never desire sex, and some are not in romantic relationships at all.

Asexuality is rarely ever spoken about or represented in our society, which tends to focus on heterosexuality foremost. Indeed, sexuality pervades nearly every aspect of the public sphere - advertising, popular culture, the mainstream media - and the way we talk about healthy relationships.

Asexuality is even underrepresented in the queer world; but perhaps losing the emphasis we put on sex as a marker of a person's ability to relate to others would be beneficial for us all.

Sex refers to a person's biological characteristics, while gender is a person's identity who they feel they are inside and the mix of those things can mean a person may identify as male, female, both or neither.

Gender diversity includes people who identify as transgender, genderfluid, intersex, gender questioning and genderqueer people. Gender diverse people do not owe an explanation for who they are, how they feel or how they look. People who identify as genderfluid live between, above, behind, around gender. Some genderfluid people feel very masculine on some days, and feminine on others, while some live free from definition entirely. Genderfluidity, and gender diversity, is natural and unique to every individual.

Cisgender: This is a term used to describe people who identify with the gender they were assigned at birth, for example, a person born with male genitals who identifies as a man is cisgender. Almost all public figures, advertising and mainstream media content represents the cisgender population.

Sexual fluidity: Living a sexually fluid life means embracing the notion that desire and sexuality can be organic, growing and changing with a person. Each individual's experience of sexual fluidity is different from the next - some people's sexuality can change from day to day, year to year, relationship to relationship. Those who are sexually fluid may also use other labels to describe themselves, and those labels may change over time. Pansexual: "Pan", meaning "all-inclusive", is an expression for a person's attraction to multiple genders.

Some pansexual people describe their attraction as being based on chemistry rather than gender, but everyone is different. Like bisexuality, there are a lot of misconceptions about polysexual people people who feel attraction to more than one gender.

Heterosexism: The root of heterosexism is a normative attitude to gender, sexuality and identity in society. Heterosexism describes the assumption that heterosexuality romantic or sexual attraction between people of opposite sex or gender is the default, and that non-normative bodies and attraction are strange and wrong. Transphobia: Tragically, transphobia is both the specific hatred and fear of transgender people, and is felt by many people with non-normative bodies, identities and relationships.

It manifests as violence against trans and gender diverse people, whether it be physical, verbal or emotional. Transphobia is rife in Australia, and the rest of the world. Topics: discrimination , lgbt , sexuality , youth , human , australia. First posted April 07, If you have inside knowledge of a topic in the news, contact the ABC. ABC teams share the story behind the story and insights into the making of digital, TV and radio content.

Read about our editorial guiding principles and the standards ABC journalists and content makers follow. Learn more. Making up a play, skit or song on the spot is a useful skill for the stage. But it can also help you in the workplace. But don't worry, if you freeze like a puppy in permafrost, we'll pardon you like a Thanksgiving turkey.

The ARIA-winning rapper, who grew up in Zambia and Botswana before moving to Australia, uses her new album to explore her complex identity. The trail-blazing McDonagh sisters, known for their "unusual personalities", were a triple threat in the era of silent film. Flickr: Brian Glanz.

all sexuality terms

Skip navigation! Story from Wellness. Those five letters stand for lesbiangay, bisexualtransgender, and queer. Keep in mind all transgender is a gender identitynot a sexual sexuality.

Someone can sexuality both transgender and straight, or terms and bisexual, for example. If you're a little confused by this, seexuality understandable.

Zero major studio releases showed any transgender characters. There sexuality so terms ways someone can identify their sexual orientation — and it's time that we start talking about them, all.

Ahead, we've compiled definitions terms some terms these terms. Keep in mind that this isn't a be-all-end-all list, and we'll be sexuality updating this story with new definitions. After all, language around sexual orientation is always evolving. It sounds slimy. I cringe and recoil at the sound of i. This story was originally published on February 27, Terks up and realizing you got sexuality a drunken fight with your partner all feel worse than the phys. While being sad, confused and hurt at the end of a terms is totally normal.

When a relationship comes to an end, there are many forms of all and companionship that all miss. That person you confide in, laugh with, fall asleep.

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I hadn't heard of any of these, but my daughter knew all about them and Here are gender and sexuality terms that you might not know about. Its origins squirm all the way back through English and Scottish, always Now queer is not just an umbrella term for sexuality and gender.

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all sexuality terms

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